ShelbyZ

I Started With a red 88 Dodge Daytona Shelby
Z with T-tops, TII, power everything, including the driver’s seat.
Not my Favorite Color, but a paint job wasn’t a priority at the time. Click
on it for more Pictures.
VIN# 1B3BA64A1JG315220




Carfax Vehicle History Report

Yr/Mfg: 1988 Dodge
Model: Daytona Shelby Z
Body: 2D H/B Subcompact car
Engine: 2.2L L4 EFI Turbo OHC
Fuel: Gasoline
Driveline: Front-wheel Drive
Aspiration: Turbocharged
Country Mfg.: United States

[My own insert —
1 – Built in USA
B – Dodge
3 – Passenger Car
B – Manual Seat Belts
A – G Body
6 – Special Sport
4 – 2 door Hatch
A – 2.2L SOHC MFI – Turbo II (should be EFI?)
1 – Check # (irrelavent)
J – 88 Modle year
G – Built in St. Louis, Missouri
315220 – Vehicale Sequence #

Carfax Vehicle History Report

The Carfax database contains the following information about this 1988 Dodge:

DATE ODOMETER INFORMATION GENERAL
REPORTED READING SOURCE COMMENTS
06/26/1991 Utah First lien reported
Motor Vehicle Dept.
Spanish Fork, UT
Title #4894005
03/23/1992 Utah First lien reported
Motor Vehicle Dept.
Spanish Fork, UT
Title #5197379
11/01/1993 Utah First lien reported
Motor Vehicle Dept.
Midvale, UT
Title #5913022
11/01/1993 Utah First lien reported
Motor Vehicle Dept.
Salt Lake City, UT
Title #5913022
11/01/1993 Utah First lien reported
Motor Vehicle Dept.
Salt Lake City, UT
Title #5913022
11/01/1993 Utah First lien reported
Motor Vehicle Dept.
West Jordan, UT
Title #5913022
  1. The first thing I did was Give it a tune up.
    My spark plugs were way over gaped, the wires were in poor shape, and it
    just seemed to need someone’s caring touch.  After these minor tune-ups, the car started to be truly fast.
  2. Well, it was almost back up to its original performance, and I can only guess it was doing mid 15 E.T.’s at about 85-90MPH.  I actually had an unofficial timing done with the help of a few friends and the St. George raceway drag strip.
    It was totally inaccurate with around 1.5 – 2 seconds of reaction time
    between all of us.  I was timed with a low 17, but with the estimated
    reaction times that would really be mid to low 15’s.
  3. After driving/racing it for a couple of weeks I
    removed the power Steering Pump.  Why?  We’ll it kind of blew
    up on me and I actually liked the way it steered without it better than
    with it.  Plus it helped with a temporary
    fix for the steering problem I was haveing.

    How to fix the common steering looseness problem in Chrysler FWD’sThe problem is that those bolts are threaded directly into the cross-member without any kind of reinforcement.  Over time the bolt holes are elongated to an egg or oval shape causing the bolts and steering to become loose.  When I got the car the driver side bolts had been worked on, but the passenger side seemed ok.  The front one was holding but the rear one wasn’t done so well because the design of the cross-member requires each one is done differently.  Near the rear bolt (on the rear side of the cross-member) someone had blowtorched a hole to get inside the cross-member then had screwed a flat, rectangular, nut on the bolt.  I think they forgot the finish the job by welding this pressure plate bolt to the cross-member.
    My temp fix was to tighten the bolt every couple of weeks.  After the steering pump went it took a lot of stress off this bolt and I only had to tighten it once every month.  Eventually, it started to hold better, but I still don’t trust it completely.  What I plan to do is tighten it down as well as I possibly can without stripping it (already done) then weld the pressure plate/nut that the bolt screws into (on the inside of the cross-member) to the cross-member, then put an additional locking nut on the end of the bolt (The other hole on the same side had already been drilled all the way through with a longer bolt put through it then tightened down with a nut and locking washer).  After all that I’ll just have to pray it stays well enough until I can get into some serious front end R&R at which time I may consider replacing the cross-member. 
  4. The Next Step was to upgrade the Stereo System, and since
    it had an Infinity System in it I had to remove the entire old system, but
    I was able to use the stock wiring thanks to some nifty little wiring harnesses
    from Crutchfield. I replaced the
    stereo with what I pulled out of my long gone
    Honda.  It’s certainly not the best system in the world, but it’s
    fairly lightweight and does the job.




    My Daytona’s Stereo System
    The Main dilemma and limiting factor with the Stereo was keeping the weight up front as it’s a front wheel drive car that I plan to go really fast in.  What this means is I couldn’t use the 12″ MTX Thunder Pro and 450 watt MTX Thunder 2160 I had in my Honda (It’s fried anyway, but boy was it kicking hard when it went).  I’ll have to keep all my amps up front so I’ll have to use a smaller amp, and I’ll have to use smaller subs mounted in the side panels of the rear seats (in front of the rear tires).  The factory holes are only 5X6’s, but with some fabrication, It seems very possible to stuff some 10″ speakers in there.  Someday I may stick some 8″ers in there so I don’t have to do so much “stuffing,” and still have them fit behind the stock plastic molding.  I had two 8’s and two amps to go with them (from my Honda’s system) but decided that for now, I was going to keep things simple so I could focus my attentions elsewhere (for now).  The whole system (except the head unit) will end up looking stock, and that’s not hard since all the speaker holes are covered up one way or another and the amp will fit behind the console.  I still can’t figure out any way to hid the CD-changer, but it’s not working too well anyway so I may just turn in my tape deck for a CD player deck later down the road.Now that I had my plan all set up I had to get started.

    I compiled the basics of what I would need, and started with the wire harness.

    I was originally going to use the stock rear speakers so I wired them up to the pre-amp outputs as the stock speakers have their own amps attached to them.  This didn’t work well as they still needed 5 volts and the Clarion’s preamps only put out around 1 volt making the speakers very quite.
    Clarion Head Unit all wired up.
    When using the stock speakers I had to wire the preamps and the remote from the deck into the Infinity wires, but that was all easily done with a some RCA wire connectors and the wiring harness from  Crutchfield it ended up being to a snap – almost literally.  This effectively put power and signal to the rear speakers through the stock wiring.  These can later be used to hook up amps and speakers if/when I ever decide to upgrade the rear speakers for more base output, but it probably wouldn’t be a good idea to push a lot of power through those stock wire so again I’d be stuck with smaller amps.
    Finally (maybe) I did the installation of the Clarion head unit in the console and MTX coaxial speakers in the doors.  It took a bit of time but wasn’t too hard (again with help from Crutchfield wiring harnesses).  I also removed the dash speakers to replace them with a pair of Pioneer tweeters.  The MTX 240 amp got squeezed behind the console to run the rear 5X7 Pioneer Coaxial speakers.  I re-did the wiring to hook the preamps and remote to the amp and ran some 10 gauge wire from the battery and to a good ground all with the proper fuses.  After double checking all the wires I hooked up the wiring harness and off it went (except for the CD-changer that doesn’t want to work).  That’s all for now, but you can probably expect me to do more with it sometime in the future. 

  5. I did some major tuning up on the car somewhere in there.
    Symptoms:
    Irregular misfire and inconsistent timing make it next to impossible to properly time. The timing, with the coolant sensor unplugged, would jump between eight and twelve degrees, and the exhaust sounded like it was missing a cylinder ever half second to second-and-a-half.
    Problem:
    Hall effect pickup shutter blades lose due to worn out plastic holding tabs.

    Description:
    The timing is advanced using a magnetic pickup called the hall effect. It is inside the distributor and can be reached by removing the cap, rotor, and hall effect pickup. What you have left is the base of the distributor with the rotor shaft and shutter blades showing. The shutter blades are held in place by plastic tabs that were melted in place when assembled. Over time these plastic tabs get worn and the blades start to wiggle.

    Fix:
    Thanks to some help from Wes Grueninger off the SDML I put together a fix that thus far I can only say is temporary until I catch up with the plastic money bills and get a new high-performance replacement, but hopefully, it will hold together for six months or more. Basically what I did, was borrowed my dad’s propane torch – used for small plumbing jobs – to heat a metallic object to remelt the plastic tabs with. At first, I wasn’t having much luck because I was using the head of a big, flat headed roofing nail that was more intent on just melting then holding the heat well enough. I started using a long flat head screwdriver with the tip snapped off which held the heat much better, but didn’t melt the tabs as uniformly. The non-uniformity of the screwdriver was actually much better because I was able to melt into the tabs much deeper and push the plastic to the edges of the taps where they would grip onto the metal better.

    Note: be sure to have a fire extinguisher close at hand any time you are working with fire, or better yet, in the car at all times. It can mean the difference between a few melted wires and/or hoses, and a completely destroyed vehicle; along with everything within five to ten feet of the vehicle. Also, be careful. It’s hot! Don’t burn yourself <duh>.

    After applying the heated screwdriver a few times to each tap – reheating between each application – the blades started to feel much more solid. I did a couple more applications to make sure they were all gripping solidly but being careful to not melt too much away and ruin it. I also didn’t want to play with it too much until I was sure it had a good grip, and even then I only tested it enough to be sure it was holding. After that, I apply four small dabs of silicon to the four holes on in the metal to hopefully provide some reinforcement. After letting the silicone set for a short minute I smeared it around the base of the blades, and over the remelted tabs to smooth it out and help connect everything together. Super glue may have worked better, but the silicone glue is what I had handy.

    Finishing up:
    I gave it time to cool down and dry while I cleaned up and put things away. I made sure everything had cooled down first – didn’t take long in the fifty-degree weather – and kept my other screwdriver out until I put everything back together. I gave the blades a final check before putting the distributor back together. Since I was under the hood anyway, I also checked the oil, and coolant along with a general visual check to make sure everything looked like it was back in place.

    Aftermath:
    As soon as I was sure everything was back together and put away, I started it up. The erratic misfire seemed to be nonexistent, the vacuum was just a bit higher, and the car seemed to warm up a bit faster. The next step was to check the timing and make sure it was where it should be instead of jumping around all over the place like it was before, and it was closed enough. At this point, I was convinced that the last major problem with this car was mostly and finally fixed; other than replacing the injectors, but that will go under the modifications category.




    Some other Ideas:
    subject:   RE: SD> Follow the Bouncing Timing Mark — What’s the Cure? and, Lumpy Idle — Related?
    Date:   Mon, 15 Feb 1999 01:57:45 -0700
    From:  Geoff Allan
    To:   Spaldam

    Hey, there’s a MUCH easier way than this!

    I fixed mine in about 92, and it has been fine ever since… just mix up some
    good epoxy, squirt it UNDER the shutter, press it down (the tabs will line
    than stock.it up straight even though it’s loose). 1 hour later it’s a permafix. I took a good look at this summer, and it is actual than stock Solid, stable, tight, and good. Never had another hall-effect problem!

  6. The next most important thing I did was to get a customized 3″ exhaust setup
    that ran up a tab of $313.00.

    E-mail to the SDML about my 3″ exhaustSubject:                3″ full Exhaust installed and the whole (Long!) day
    Date:             Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:39:14 -0600
    From:            Spaldam DanmSpam
    Organization:       The Rotisory Foundation
    To:              shelby-dodge@ListService.net        Boy what a day it has been, and a long one at that.  It all started at
    around 10:30 am when I first got up (no I didn’t sleep in, I’m just on a
    later schedule then most, and it works well to avoid traffic).  By
    around Noon I had spent about an hour driving through rain, snow, sleet,
    and wind to get about forty or fifty miles south in Provo to meet up
    with Dempsey Bowling.  After a short discussion I was off driving
    through the snow again following Dempsey’s Gold GLH Turbo close behind.
    Shortly we arrived at Tom’s exhaust shop to get all these exhaust parts
    installed that I’d been acquiring over the last few months (some more
    recent then others).
    We had some time so we went in Dempsey’s GLH to Carles Jr. to get some
    grub.  Not a bad little car, or I guess you could say it’s one bad
    little car 🙂 (hopefully I can line up with him sometime this summer at
    RMR – how about it Dempsey?). O, the radar detector was nice, too.
    Anyway, by the time we get back Tom has just gotten through all the
    other cars in line before me and is ready to start on mine.  It was a
    fun experience to watch him work away on all that pre-mandrel-bent pipe
    (some of which didn’t seem to be bent quite right, but it eventually all
    fit), and to see the new exhaust system come together. It was a bit
    tight over the rear axle, but it was able to fit.
    I was a bit concerned about how loud it was going to end up being, but
    as soon as I started it up I wasn’t sure what to think.  It didn’t seem
    any louder then before, and I actually think it’s quieter inside the car
    then it was before or at least at idle.  I hit the gas a few times and
    it didn’t sound much louder then it did before.  We paid the man for his
    good work and took it for a short drive around the block.  At first it
    didn’t seem to much faster then it did before, but I did notice the
    turbo spooling up much faster. I was driving relatively lower speeds and
    had Dempsey in the car to add some weight (though I’m sure he doesn’t
    weigh as much as I do).
    I thanked Dempsey for the fun afternoon, and was headed home with the
    sun starting to shine through. On the way home I was merging from one
    freeway onto another, and that is really a mess with all the
    construction going on. I had to take an exit with a 40 adviser speed
    that should probably be more like 25 because of the steep drop and sharp
    turn that turns into the left hand lane on the other freeway.  As soon
    as traffic gave me an opening I merged right hit the gas with it in
    second gear and the thing just took off like nothing nothing else
    leaving the slow pokes in the left lane behind.  The Mustang directly
    behind me tried to keep up, but didn’t have much of a chance until I
    notice I was going ten over and stop excelerating. The car had never
    done that before, and has apparently picked up a lot of mid to high end
    power with the less restrictive exhaust (I should have expected that,
    but wasn’t ready for it.  What a rush).
    I stopped by work for a bit, then headed home again only to run into
    more snow, but luckily it just turns out that I was to fast for the snow
    as it continued to clear up shortly after I got home. After some dinner,
    I jacked the car up, took some pictures, changed the oil, wrapped the
    down pipe with header wrap, and used some of what was left over to make
    a cushion around the tight areas to reduce rattling noises (it worked
    quite well too, and thanks to Dempsey for the idea – he has a few of
    them up his sleeve).  I cleaned the car up and did a few other things
    here an there to it, put everything away and took a brake for a while.
    Latter that evening I went out to show off my new modifications to my
    friends.  My best friend was not only impressed, but jealous that he
    hasn’t gotten his planed exhaust system put on his car yet. He seemed to
    think it was louder, and said there was defiantly a difference in the
    turbo response, and the car seemed less effected by his weight then it
    had in the past.  Latter that night we headed further North to Ogden to
    cruse down the boulevard.  We got in one good race with a 69 Chevy
    pickup that was slammed with dual exhaust that was much louder them my
    3″.  It was a good race, but I over took him both times, and the second
    time he even got a head start. For once I was actually getting people to
    turn there heads just by reving the engine, were as before I had to
    actually show them what it could do before they would believe it to be
    race worthy. The few other races I had were almost worthless as I kept
    leaving everyone far behind by only accelerating quickly up to the speed
    limit, and a lot of their cars that might have been really fast didn’t
    seem to want to play with me. 🙁 I ended up staying up there much longer
    then originally planed as I was having to much fun, but the night was
    wearing on, everyone was leaving, and the copes were starting to have
    better ratios, so we took off and headed for home.
    Over all I’ll have to say that the exhaust is louder over all, but in
    some ways it seems quieter, especially inside the car.  The best part is
    the lower tone and the sound the Dynomax Race muffler (glorified glass
    pack as Dempsey put it) gave it (I wish I could remember how my friend
    put it, but was basically describing a typical glass pack type sound),
    but I wouldn’t mind it being a little louder at idle.  It sounds a lot
    more muscle y, and rightly so, as it has made a definite improvement.
    So the sound is good and not to loud, the turbo spools faster giving the
    car a much better throttle response at low RPMs, the mid and high power
    range is much improved and likely were the biggest power gain is.
    Next up, I’ve got to get some gages so I can know exactly what going on
    to help me tune the fuel system how I need it to be so I can up the
    boost some. A BOV would be a good idea at this point too, and I’m
    thinking an under drive pulley and some suspension work would also be
    good at this point.  Hopefully I can get those things and a few other
    odds and ends done over the next month and a half.


    Späldàm – http://[onward.to/spaldam]
    88 Daytona Shelby Z TII T-Tops
    K&N “Cone” Filter  RU 09-10
    3″ Full Exhaust Just installed 😎 – SLC, UT

  7. More to come once I get into customizing the intake/intercooler setup, and the ND performance computer ((602) ###-####).
    I’ve also got a few ideas of my own that I hope will help, and then if I feel
    I need that little extra power insight consider nitrous.  I was hoping to hit high 13’s on my E.T. without nitrous in a full interior (minus some weight here and there) daily driver without compromising the 30+MPG I get while taking the freeway to work, but as for now I traded it in for a Toyota Pickup that I’m haveing fun will as well. Hopefully, in the next year (or never as it turns out), I’ll pick up another Daytona and do a real project with it.
    Shelby Dodge Mailing List

Check out the Shelby dodge
Mailing list
, and my first E-mail to
the list:

My first Shelby dodge Mailing List letter

Hello, I’m new to this mailing list, and subscribed to it mainly for help
with my ’88 Dodge Daytona Shelby Z with T-tops that I acquired about two
months ago.  I’m still getting it tooned up and working properly with a fairly
in depth tune up on it, but for the most part it’s running strong and
efficient.  First I’d like to know where I can get all the specs for this car,
as well as how many of my specific car were manufactured.  I’m also looking for the best, safest way to get the car to go a second and a half faster in the
quarter mile with minimal cost (I do plan to do the as much of the work as I
can my self).

What I’ve gathered so far:

1) I’m planing on getting a new exhaust system that’s 2.5″ to 3″ in diameter
with a high flow Cat. and Muffler (I may keep the stock exhaust up to the cat
to save money for now).  What I’m not sure of is what kind of muffler to use,
and I do need to use one along with the Cat.  I’ve heard that a glass-pack
type muffler or straight pipe will not be very loud with the cat and turbo,
but I have a friend that swears it will be very loud because of resonant
frequencies that exhausts make without a muffler to quite it.  Can anyone tell
me what kind of setups they have and how many decibels they are producing at idle and at full throttle near redline?

2) New computer.  I’d like one that will control everything the way it needs to
be controled so I don’t have to fabricate anything to be controled by myself.
I’d also like to keep most of my fuel efficiency while driving it nicely
around town and down the freeway to work, but wouldn’t mind lossing some of that efficiency while getting on it.  As it is now I seem to be getting close
to 30mpg no matter how I drive it.

3) Intake.  I’m thinking of getting a K&N coned air filter to replace the stock
filter, and some rubber hose to replaced the baffled ones comeing off the
inter cooler to the throttle body.  The questions I have about this is what to
do with the hoses comeing off the PCV valve, and how do I keep a maximum amount of cooler outside air comeing in.

4) Get some more boost out of the turbo.  I understand the turbo I have can do
21psi, should be doing up to 15, and is doning around 12 or 13 (I need a better
boost gage for sure, and would like one that goes from 25 to 25).  I’d like it
to do 21psi if I can get it to do so safely, and I’m hopeing a new computer
will help me accomplish this. Would I need to also upgrade other parts of the
engine along with this such as injecters or sensors, and what are some good
computers to get for this car?  I’m also thinking of putting a heat shield
between the turbo and intake manifold.

5) Last, but possibly not least, Nitrous.  I’m thinking of a small 25hp kit,
and with the figures I’ve seen and done on my own it seems that with it’s
cooling effects would actually give me 50hp as the car sits now.  I also
understand 50hp should be safe, but I want to be sure.

Now, any suggestions on how to best do all this to work together in the best
way it can, and still be a reliable safe daily driver?  I feel I’ve already
gotten a fair amount of information on how to do all this safely and to
hopefully get the gains I’m looking for with all this, and I’m fairly certain
that this is the direction I want to go.  I would still appreciate any
additional input, and additional ideas anyone might have for me.

Thanks.
Spaldam
P.S. if you see a red 88 Daytona Shelby Z with t-tops and Utah license of
SPALDAM driveing around, be sure to wave.

Replies

Re: SD> New to the Shelby Dodge Mailing List with an 88 Daytona

From: Gus
Date: Tue Oct 20 06:43:30 98

Spaldam Danmspam wrote:

> 1) I’m planing on getting a new exhaust system that’s 2.5″ to 3″ in diameter
> with a high flow Cat.

Good idea!    2.5″ inlet-outlet  universal cat = $59.99 plus shipping
from Don’s Hot Rod Shop  1-800-888-8892.

>and Muffler (I may keep the stock exhaust up to the cat
> to save money for now).

Walker Race Magnum 2.5″ muffler from Summit Racing. Rather loud without a cat, but rather nice with one…

>  What I’m not sure of is what kind of muffler to use,
> and I do need to use one along with the Cat.  I’ve heard that a glass-pack
> type muffler or straight pipe will not be very loud with the cat and turbo,
> but I have a friend that swears it will be very loud because of resonant
> frequencies that exhausts make without a muffler to quite it.  Can anyone tell
> me what kind of setups they have and how many decibels they are producing at
> idle and at full throttle near redline?

Don’t know the decibals; can only tell you that it’s ignored by all
policemen, and makes you fast. You DID mention wanting to go fast?? 😉

>
> 2) New computer.  I’d like one that will control everything the way it needs to
> be controled so I don’t have to fabricate anything to be controled by myself.

BINGO!  ND’s performance computers are on sale, RIGHT NOW! You better hurry. The computer will raise your boost and give you more fuel,
aggressive timing, higher rpm cut out, and other goodies. That, along
with a free flow exhaust and a K&N, should take over a second off.
Gus

SD> Re: New to the Shelby Dodge Mailing List with an 88 Daytona

From: Todd & Cynthia Dietrich
Date: Tue Oct 20 07:56:52 98

Spaldam Danmspam wrote:

>      Hello, I’m new to this mailing list, and subscribed to it mainly for help
> with my ’88 Dodge Daytona Shelby Z with T-tops that I acquired about two
> months ago.

Welcome we hope your stay is an enjoyable one! 😉

> I’m still getting it tooned up and working properly with a fairly
> in depth tune up on it, but for the most part it’s running strong and
> efficient.

Good idea. Any motor that is not properly tuned will not make good power.
Sometimes the smallest things (like sparkplugs) cause the biggest problems.

> First I’d like to know where I can get all the specs for this car,
> as well as how many of my specific car were manufactured.

Its out there somewhere…..like the “truth”. 😉

> I’m also looking for
> the best, safest way to get the car to go a second and a half faster in the
> quarter mile with minimal cost (I do plan to do the as much of the work as I
> can my self).

Second and a half on a stock loaded out Shelby Z would mean low 14’s.  Should not be hard at all to achieve that.

> 1) I’m planing on getting a new exhaust system that’s 2.5″ to 3″ in diameter
> with a high flow Cat. and Muffler (I may keep the stock exhaust up to the cat
> to save money for now).  What I’m not sure of is what kind of muffler to use,
> and I do need to use one along with the Cat.  I’ve heard that a glass-pack
> type muffler or straight pipe will not be very loud with the cat and turbo,
> but I have a friend that swears it will be very loud because of resonant
> frequencies that exhausts make without a muffler to quite it.  Can anyone tell
> me what kind of setups they have and how many decibels they are producing at
> idle and at full throttle near redline?

I would recommend at least a full 2.5 system. Also note that Jessie Buhr just
mentioned he will be taking orders for 3″ mandrel bent systems for G-bodies.  Wait and it will be worth your while! Mufflers, if you are concerned about noise, then I would suggest ordering a Dynomax Super Turbo (or Summit Racing’s Turbo muffler, same thing half price).  If noise is not quite as important, then go with Dynomax Race Magnum.  Since you plan on running a ocnverter, this really should not be all that loud.

> 2) New computer.  I’d like one that will control everything the way it needs to
> be controled so I don’t have to fabricate anything to be controled by myself.

I would highly recommend calling Neil Emiro.  He is having a sale, but on this you will have to act quickly!  If you are wanting to “all out” I would suggest the 3bar MAP and +40% injector program.  But if you want to stay relatively sane, then I would suggest staying with your stock 2bar MAP and getting a program that will run the +20% injectors.

> 3) Intake.  I’m thinking of getting a K&N coned air filter to replace the stock
> filter, and some rubber hose to replaced the baffled ones comeing off the
> inter cooler to the throttle body.  The questions I have about this is what to
> do with the hoses comeing off the PCV valve, and how do I keep a maximum amount
> of cooler outside air comeing in.

This too is a wise choice.  You can fabricate some hose/tubing that will allow you to mount the filter low, so that it sits (at least partially) in a direct airflow.
I personally used an Akimoto filter that I have hooked a ram-air setup to the inner funnel.  The key here is you can get creative, so do!

> 4) Get some more boost out of the turbo.  I understand the turbo I have can do
> 21psi, should be doing up to 15, and is doning around 12 or 13 (I need a better
> boost gage for sure, and would like one that goes from 25 to 25).  I’d like it
> to do 21psi if I can get it to do so safely, and I’m hopeing a new computer
> will help me accomplish this. Would I need to also upgrade other parts of the
> engine along with this such as injecters or sensors, and what are some good
> computers to get for this car?  I’m also thinking of putting a heat shield
> between the turbo and intake manifold.

I would not recommend running a stock turbo at 21psi very often or for very long with out some SERIOUS improvement to your intercooler’s efficiency.  It will generate far too much heat for a stock intercooler.  Stick in the 15-18 range, you will keep several things (including the turbo) in one piece a little longer that way.

> 5) Last, but possibly not least, Nitrous.  I’m thinking of a small 25hp kit,
> and with the figures I’ve seen and done on my own it seems that with it’s
> cooling effects would actually give me 50hp as the car sits now.  I also
> understand 50hp should be safe, but I want to be sure.

Not a bad idea, a “Cheater Kit”.  But if you complete the steps you have already outlined, you may not even need it! But hey who wouldn’t want a spare 25-50HP waiting for just the flip of a switch? 😉

> Now, any suggestions on how to best do all this to work together in the best
> way it can, and still be a reliable safe daily driver?  I feel I’ve already
> gotten a fair amount of information on how to do all this safely and to
> hopefully get the gains I’m looking for with all this, and I’m fairly certain
> that this is the direction I want to go.  I would still appreciate any
> additional input, and additional ideas anyone might have for me.

You certainly have done your homework.  You have addressed all the major areas and have a very good plan to get that “land yacht” moving!

Later,
Todd Dietrich
’88 Shelby Z
Memphis, TN


Here’s my Cam Specs. that go with my roller rockers:  1988
Turbo I/II  PN: 4387850 .430 Lift 236/232 Duration
Injectors and comparisons (I’m going to use the +20%
ones)

P4529495
Mopar Performance +20%
42 lbs/hr at 55psi

5277895
2.5L/Turbo II (current stock replacement)
34.85 lb/hr at 55psi

4418258         Stock
Turbo II (89 vintage)   32 lbs/hr at 55psi

 






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